PEOPLE & FORESTS URN

MARCUS TATTON, PEOPLE AND FORESTS URN, 1996

MYRTLE, CARBON
735(H) X 410(Ø) mm

THE WORK

This wonderful urn was carved from one piece of myrtle. The urn’s external decoration is patterning that respects past cultures and is redolent of hieroglyphics. The images evoke feelings of forests and natural forms interacting with human perspectives. The interior represents the coexistence of man within nature by showing footprints of local fauna interspersed with the tracks of excavators and humans.

THE DESIGNER

The feel of the land and forest is a central aspect of Marcus’ current practice as a woodcarver. He works as a public space sculptor from his property in Neika, Tasmania. The themes running through his work are the remnants left by past civilisations; the symbols and signs of forgotten or dispersed cultures appearing in natural materials and the intersection of nature with humans.

“I think it's important to show that things have been made by humans. If there's an overabundance of machine-made things in our lives I think we lose the essence of why we are alive, so sandpaper is just one of those tools I don't agree with much. “

With business partner Dan Magnus, Marcus operated Log Drums Percussion until 1988 producing a variety of traditional and customised percussion instruments in Tasmanian timbers. Marcus continues to make commissioned djembe, conga and taiko, preparing the skins used in the drums himself.

Born: 1963, Taumarunui, New Zealand

Training: Bachelor of Fine Art (Furniture Design), University of Tasmania, 1989

Represented:    Royal Tasmanian Botanic, Hobart; Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, Hobart; Ronald C Wornick Collection, San Francisco; Wood Turning Centre Collection, Philadelphia; Rodney Smorgon Collection; Montalto Vineyard, Mornington Peninsula; The Ponds, Blacktown, Western Sydney.